O'Really?

September 4, 2009

XML training in Oxford

XML Summer School 2009The XML Summer School returns this year at St. Edmund Hall, Oxford from 20th-25th September 2009. As always, it’s packed with high quality technical training for every level of expertise, from the Hands-on Introduction for beginners through to special classes devoted to XQuery and XSLT, Semantic Technologies, Open Source Applications, Web 2.0, Web Services and Identity. The Summer School is also a rare opportunity to experience what life is like as a student in one of the world’s oldest university cities while enjoying a range of social events that are a part of the unique summer school experience.

This year, classes and sessions are taught and chaired by:

W3C XML 10th anniversaryThe Extensible Markup Language (XML) has been around for just over ten years, quickly and quietly finding its niche in many different areas of science and technology. It has been used in everything from modelling biochemical networks in systems biology [1], to electronic health records [2], scientific publishing, the provision of the PubMed service (which talks XML) [3] and many other areas. As a crude measure of its importance in biomedical science, PubMed currently has no fewer than 800 peer-reviewed publications on XML. It’s hard to imagine life without it. So whether you’re a complete novice looking to learn more about XML or a seasoned veteran wanting to improve your knowledge, register your place and find out more by visiting xmlsummerschool.com. I hope to see you there…

References

  1. Hucka, M. (2003). The systems biology markup language (SBML): a medium for representation and exchange of biochemical network models Bioinformatics, 19 (4), 524-531 DOI: 10.1093/bioinformatics/btg015
  2. Bunduchi R, Williams R, Graham I, & Smart A (2006). XML-based clinical data standardisation in the National Health Service Scotland. Informatics in primary care, 14 (4) PMID: 17504574
  3. Sayers, E., Barrett, T., Benson, D., Bryant, S., Canese, K., Chetvernin, V., Church, D., DiCuccio, M., Edgar, R., Federhen, S., Feolo, M., Geer, L., Helmberg, W., Kapustin, Y., Landsman, D., Lipman, D., Madden, T., Maglott, D., Miller, V., Mizrachi, I., Ostell, J., Pruitt, K., Schuler, G., Sequeira, E., Sherry, S., Shumway, M., Sirotkin, K., Souvorov, A., Starchenko, G., Tatusova, T., Wagner, L., Yaschenko, E., & Ye, J. (2009). Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information Nucleic Acids Research, 37 (Database) DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkn741

June 1, 2009

Scott Marshall on Interoperability

M. Scott MarshallScott Marshall is visiting Manchester this week, he will be doing a seminar on Friday 5th June, here are some details for anyone who is interested in attending:

Speaker: Dr. M. Scott Marshall, The University of Amsterdam

Date/Time: 5th June 2009, 11:00

Location: Room MLG.001 (Lecture Theatre), MIB building, (number 16 on campus map)

Title: Standards Enabled Interoperability: W3C Semantic Web for Health Care and Life Sciences Interest Group

Abstract: The W3C Semantic Web for Health Care and Life Sciences Interest Group (HCLS) has the mission of developing, advocating for, and supporting the use of Semantic Web technologies for biological science, translational medicine and health care. HCLS covers hot topics including data integration and federation, bridging commonly used domain standards such as CDISC and HL7, and the applications of medical terminologies. This talk will introduce the HCLS, as well as provide an overview of the activities that are currently ongoing within the task forces, as well as new developments and the recent Face2Face meeting. The role of information extraction and the current interest in Shared Identifiers will also be discussed.

References

  1. Ruttenberg, A., Rees, J., Samwald, M., & Marshall, M. (2009). Life sciences on the Semantic Web: the Neurocommons and beyond Briefings in Bioinformatics, 10 (2), 193-204 DOI: 10.1093/bib/bbp004

October 27, 2008

OWL Experiences and Directions (OWLED) 2008

Great Grey Owl by Brian ScottThe Web Ontology Language (OWL) is a language for creating ontologies on the Web. It does exactly what it says on the tin. But what is an ontology? One way to think of it is as a better way of storing data and knowledge. Instead of just capturing and describing data in a databases, ontology languages like OWL provide ways to capture and describe knowledge in a knowledge base. Ontologies can allow more intelligent querying, integration and understanding of data than is possible using a plain old relational database.

Since 2003 developers and users of the Web Ontology Language, abbreviated to OWL (not WOL), have been gathering at a two-day workshop called OWLED (OWL Experiences and Directions). This year the workshop is in Karlsruhe in Germany. The full list of accepted papers is available, as with previous years, this years workshop has a distinctly biological flavour to the proceedings: (more…)

April 25, 2008

WWW2008: The Great Firewall of China

Passage [The Great Wall / Beijing] by d'n'cThe seventeenth international World Wide Web conference (WWW2008.org) is currently finishing in Beijing, China. There are some interesting papers this year. Thankfully, the Great Firewall of China doesn’t prevent these papers reaching the rest of the world. It’s One World, One Web (allegedly). Here are some brief highlights from the conference. (more…)

December 12, 2006

Semantic Web for Life Sciences Book

Filed under: semweb — Duncan Hull @ 4:57 pm
Tags: ,

Revolutionizing Knowledge Discovery in the Life Sciences
All I want for Christmas is a book about the semantic web, written by people who are actually building and using it, rather than “visionaries” who don’t have to. Maybe this year I’ll be lucky…

A group of semantic webheads (aka HCLSIG the Health Care and Life Sciences Interest Group) led by Christopher J. Baker and Kei-Hoi Cheung and gathered together on public-semweb-lifesci@w3.org have written a book about the semantic web for life sciences.

I haven’t seen the final printed version of this book yet, but if you want to add it to your christmas amazon wishlist, its called Semantic Web: Revolutionizing Knowledge Discovery in the Life Sciences (ISBN:0387484361). The table of contents for the book (DOI:10.1007/978-0-387-48438-9) has more details if you are interested.

So what about other readers, what bioinformatics presents (not just books) would they like to find under the Christmas tree this year? If you don’t celebrate Christmas, what Solstice wishes do you have?

(see original post at nodalpoint for comments)

July 19, 2006

May 24, 2006

Dub Dub Dub 2006

WWW2006
The 15th International World Wide Web conference is currently underway in Edinburgh, Bonny Scotland. As usual, this popular conference has some good papers, only 11%* of submissions are accepted. One particular paper caught my eye: One Document to Bind Them: Combining XML, Web Services, and the Semantic Web. This paper has probably been selected because it will wind people up (sorry I mean “spark a debate”) so its an entertaining and sometimes enlightening read.

In this paper, Harry Halpin and Henry Thompson make some observations about the state of the web in 2006:

But, according to the authors, it doesn’t have to be this way…

  1. Many (but not all) web services are functions that are available on the web,
  2. The semantic web gives us an elaborate type system, using ontologies, which can extend what we already have with XML Schema
  3. The combination of the first two, gives us Semantic Web Services which are typed functions. This allows us to invoke web services not just by their URI (e.g. http://xml.nig.ac.jp/xddbj/Blast for a Blast service), but by the type of information they have. E.g. you have an output of type BLAST_report or perhaps InterProScan_report, what services will take this as input? What operations can be performed on this data? This sounds a lot like BioMOBY, with bells on.

What Harry and Henry propose is tying all this together using a single XML vocabulary, called Semantic fXML, to put “a unified abstraction of data, types and functions” so that the web can compute. This is all a bit pie-in-the-sky vision of the future stuff, but what might it mean for your average bioinformatican? It would be seriously useful if we could make the current molecular biology web services easier to use, but agreeing on and using an ontology for annotating the types of the inputs and outputs of all the services is non-trivial task. Bioinformaticians already have a (somewhat limited) universal type system for describing all data in bioinformatics, its called string. Persuading them to use something more powerful is not easy unless the benefits are immediately obvious.

At the moment, it is difficult to tell if sfXML will ever have any impact on bioinformatics but who cares? Despite this, the paper is enjoyable reminder of what is interesting about services on the Web. They transform the web from a place where we can merely search and browse for data (sequences, genes, proteins, metabolic pathways, systems etc), into “one vast de-centralised computer” a bit like the one described in can computers explain biology? This, in my humble opinion, is what makes the web and bioinformatics an exciting place to work in 2006.

* Footnote: Of nearly 700 papers submitted: only 81 research papers were accepted (11%). This is a 25% increase on the number of submissions last year to www2005 in Chiba, Japan.

References

  1. Harry Halpin and Henry S. Thompson (2006) One Document to Bind Them: Combining XML, Web Services, and the Semantic Web in Proceedings of the 15th international conference on World Wide Web, Edinburgh Scotland DOI:10.1145/1135777.1135877
  2. This post originally published on nodalpoint with comments

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