O'Really?

March 15, 2012

Be nice to nerds … you may end up working for them

Thought for the day: be nice to nerds because you might end of up working for them.

This sound advice comes from DARPA defector and newly appointed Googler Regina Dugan (see picture below).

Regina Dugan by Steve Jurvetson

What’s that you say? You’re not sure exactly what a nerd is? There are many definitions but the graphic below sums it up better than the Oxford English Dictionary ever could.

Are you a nerd, geek, dork or dweeb?

But beware! Many self-confessed nerds may actually be dorks, dweebs or geeks. It’s a grey area out there in the Venn of Nerdery, not quite as clear cut as the diagram above. To be sure of treating nerds right, you’ll need to be nice to dorks, dweebs and geeks too! See video for details…

[Creative Commons licensed picture of Regina Dugan at TED via Steve Jurvetson]

May 4, 2010

Ian Wilmut on the World after Dolly the Sheep

Bicolor sheep by Tambako the Jaguar, on FlickrAs part of the Gates Distinguished Lecture Series, Ian Wilmut will be giving a public lecture today in Cambridge titled Cloning, Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine: The World After Dolly. More details below from talks.cam.ac.uk:

“Ian Wilmut soared to international prominence when Dolly, a baby lamb created from the cells of an adult sheep [1,2], was revealed to the world. Dolly was the first genetic replica of a living creature created from cells from an adult animal. The accomplishment sparked amazement and controversy as scientists, philosophers, ethicists and religious leaders perceived the potential to extend such work to humans.”

All are encouraged to attend, lecture starts at 6pm today the Cambridge Union Society see press release from the University. [Update: Note last minute change from previously advertised venue at Emmanuel College, Cambridge. See also the accompanying podcast page].
Audio of talk available

References

  1. Campbell, K., McWhir, J., Ritchie, W., & Wilmut, I. (1996). Sheep cloned by nuclear transfer from a cultured cell line Nature, 380 (6569), 64-66 DOI: 10.1038/380064a0
  2. Wilmut, I., Schnieke, A., McWhir, J., Kind, A., & Campbell, K. (1997). Viable offspring derived from fetal and adult mammalian cells Nature, 385 (6619), 810-813 DOI: 10.1038/385810a0

July 4, 2008

Who Owns Science?

Padlock and Key picture by Imagined RealityThis thing called Science, whatever it is, who actually owns it? Scientists? Technology companies? Industrial Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical companies? Investors? Shareholders? Governments? Universities? Philanthropists? Charities? Publishers? Joe Public? Or none of the above…?

  1. The Scientists. At the front line of any scientific discovery is a scientist, from the lofty heights of the hallowed Professor to the lowly lab-rat or student, slaving away at the bench, scientists work on the front line Science. For most scientists, they make a living from their inventions, ideas and discoveries that they own. Science is their livelihood, © The Author(s).
  2. (more…)

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